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Monday, March 27, 2017

Photo of the Day: Admiring a Jovian Masterpiece...

Jupiter's cloud tops as seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft from a distance of 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers)...on February 2, 2017.
NASA / JPL - Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Roman Tkachenko

Dark Spot and Jovian ‘Galaxy’ (News Release)

This enhanced-color image of a mysterious dark spot on Jupiter seems to reveal a Jovian “galaxy” of swirling storms.

Juno acquired this JunoCam image on Feb. 2, 2017, at 5:13 a.m. PDT (8:13 a.m. EDT), at an altitude of 9,000 miles (14,500 kilometers) above the giant planet’s cloud tops. This publicly selected target was simply titled “Dark Spot.” In ground-based images it was difficult to tell that it is a dark storm.

Citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko enhanced the color to bring out the rich detail in the storm and surrounding clouds. Just south of the dark storm is a bright, oval-shaped storm with high, bright, white clouds, reminiscent of a swirling galaxy. As a final touch, he rotated the image 90 degrees, turning the picture into a work of art.

JunoCam's raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

Source: NASA.Gov

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